Cariogenic and erosive potential of industrialized fruit juices available in Brazil

Authors

  • Leopoldina de Fátima Dantas de Almeida Federal University of Paraiba, Joao Pessoa, PB,
  • Gisely Maria Freire Abílio Federal University of Paraiba
  • Mônica Tejo Cavalcante Federal University of Paraiba
  • Ricardo Dias Castro Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa, PB
  • Alessandro Leite Cavalcanti State University of Paraiba, Campina Grande, PB

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.20396/bjos.v9i3.8641781

Keywords:

Beverages, Hydrogen-ion concentration, Dietary sucrose, Dental caries, Tooth erosion

Abstract

Aim: This in vitro study evaluated the cariogenic and erosive potential of different industrialized fruit juices available in the Brazilian market. Methods: Twenty-five samples of fruit juices were analyzed physically and chemically by means of the following parameters: pH, titratable acidity (TA) and total soluble solid content (TSSC), reducing sugars (e.g.: glucose), non-reducing sugars (e.g.: sucrose) and total sugars. The analyses were made in triplicate. Data were collected by a single examiner and were recorded in study-specific charts. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey’s post-test (p<0.05). Results: All fruit juices showed pH below the critical value of 5.5, with significant differences among the samples (p<0.0001). Mango juice (Jandaia®) presented the lowest TSSC (10.25 oBrix), while orange juice (Del Valle®) presented the highest TSSC (12.75 o Brix), with no significant differences among the samples. The lowest and the highest TA values were recorded for cashew juice (Jandaia®) (0.13%) and passion fruit (Del Valle®) (0.52%), respectively (p<0.0001). For reducing sugars (glucose), the highest value was recorded for purple fruit juice (Skinka®) (10.85 g/100mL) and the lowest was recorded for strawberry juice (Kapo®) (1.84 g/100mL). Regarding non-reducing sugars (sucrose), the values ranged from 0.45 g/100mL (passion fruit/Del Valle®) to 9.07 g/100mL (orange/Del Valle®). Purple fruit juice (Skinka®) presented the highest total sugars content (12.09 g/100mL), while guava juice (Jandaia®) presented the lowest content (7.25 g/100mL). There were significant differences among the samples for reducing, non-reducing and total sugars (p<0.0001). Conclusions: The industrialized fruit juices evaluated in this study presented low pH and a high total sugar content, differing in their erosive and cariogenic potential, respectively.

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Author Biographies

Leopoldina de Fátima Dantas de Almeida, Federal University of Paraiba, Joao Pessoa, PB,

Undergraduate student, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Paraiba, Joao Pessoa, PB,

Gisely Maria Freire Abílio, Federal University of Paraiba

BS, Pharmacist, Assistant Professor, Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa, PB

Mônica Tejo Cavalcante, Federal University of Paraiba

PhD Student, Department of Process Engineering, Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa, PB

Ricardo Dias Castro, Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa, PB

DDS, MSc, Assistant Professor, Department of Community Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa, PB

Alessandro Leite Cavalcanti, State University of Paraiba, Campina Grande, PB

DDS, MSc, PhD, Professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, State University of Paraiba, Campina Grande, PB

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Published

2015-11-18

How to Cite

1.
Almeida L de FD de, Abílio GMF, Cavalcante MT, Castro RD, Cavalcanti AL. Cariogenic and erosive potential of industrialized fruit juices available in Brazil. Braz. J. Oral Sci. [Internet]. 2015Nov.18 [cited 2020Oct.27];9(3):351-7. Available from: https://periodicos.sbu.unicamp.br/ojs/index.php/bjos/article/view/8641781

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